Friday, March 16, 2012

Dreams and Reality - a touching video

I've seen a few cancer moms posting this link, and I was in tears watching it yesterday.  I watched it again today and I am so in love with all of these beautiful children.  So brutally unfair.  They are amazing.


I also read an article in the Huffington Post recently that was posted to the Facebook of another wonderful mom who lost her beautiful boy to cancer less than a year ago.  It's about being a mom to a special needs or chronically ill child - and the truth about the amazing joys and triumphs among tears and heartache.  Here it is in full, but I pasted below excerpts that rang especially true for me.   

"Chances are that you know a special needs parent, or you may be one yourself. As a special needs parent, I often don't share my feelings on this aspect of my life, even with my closest friends, so I decided to compile a list here with the goal of building understanding... I don't claim to speak for every special needs parent out there, but from the ones I know, some of these are pretty universal...

I am tired. Parenting is already an exhausting endeavor. But parenting a special needs child takes things to another level of fatigue. Even if I've gotten a good night's sleep, or have had some time off, there is a level of emotional and physical tiredness that is always there, that simply comes from the weight of tending to those needs. Hospital and doctors' visits are not just a few times a year, they may be a few times a month. Therapies may be daily. Paperwork and bills stack up, spare time is spent researching new treatments, positioning him to sit a certain way, advocating for him in the medical and educational system. This is not to mention the emotional toll of raising a special needs child, since the peaks and valleys seem so much more extreme for us. I am always appreciative of any amount of grace or help from friends to make my life easier, no matter how small, from arranging plans around my schedule and location, to watching my son while I am eating.

I am jealous. It's a hard one for me to come out and say, but it's true. When I see a 1-year-old baby do what my son can't at 4 years-old (like walk), I feel a pang of jealousy. It hurts when I see my son struggling so hard to learn to do something that comes naturally to a typical kid, like chewing or pointing. It can be hard to hear about the accomplishments of my friend's kids. Sometimes, I just mourn inside for Jacob, "It's not fair." Weirdly enough, I can even feel jealous of other special needs kids who seem to have an easier time than Jacob, or who have certain disorders like Downs, or autism, which are more mainstream and understood by the public, and seem to offer more support and resources than Jacob's rare condition. It sounds petty, and it doesn't diminish all my joy and pride in my son's accomplishments. But often it's very hard for me to be around typical kids with him.

I am scared. I worry that I'm not doing enough. What if I missed a treatment or a diagnosis and that window of optimal time to treat it has passed? I worry about Jacob's future, whether he will ever drive a car, or get married, or live independently. I am scared thinking of the hurts he will experience being "different" in what's often a harsh world (not to mention that I fear for the physical safety of the person who inflicts any hurt upon my son). I am scared about finances. Finally, I fear what will happen to Jacob if anything were to happen to me. In spite of this, my fears have subsided greatly over the years because of my faith...

I am human. I have been challenged and pushed beyond my limits in raising my son. I've grown tremendously as a person, and developed a soft heart and empathy for others in a way I never would have without him. But I'm just like the next mom in some ways. Sometimes I get cranky, my son irritates me, and sometimes I just want to flee to the spa or go shopping (and, um, I often do). I still have dreams and aspirations of my own. I travel... love good food... talk about dating. I watch Mad Men, and like a good cashmere sweater. Sometimes it's nice to escape and talk about all these other things. And if it seems that the rest of my life is all I talk about sometimes, it's because it can be hard to talk about my son.

Raising a special needs child shatters all the "should bes" that we idolize and build our lives around, and puts something else at the core: love and understanding. So maybe that leads me to the last thing you don't know about a special needs parent... I may have it tough, but in many ways I feel really blessed."
-- Maria Lin

2 comments:

  1. Cindy, I have been following your blog for over a year now and I can't tell you how much you and Ty have inspired me. You are such and amazing mom! And Ty what an amazing fighter. I am always sharing your story to spread the word. I have a friend who would love to help make more people aware of pediatric cancer and how terrible it is. She shares many of the same feeling as you when it comes to the lack of awareness about pediatric diseases. She started the Traveling Awareness Bears. She would love to talk to you about what she can do to get awareness out there. Please contact and I would love to do whatever I could to help. loriwaiting@gmail.com
    Love and well wishes always
    Lori Kettler Waiting - from Wantagh High School -soccer and basketball :)

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